C-Suite Disconnect is Weakening Cybersecurity

Today, Centrify announced a new research study conducted with Dow Jones Customer Intelligence titled, “CEO Disconnect is Weakening Cybersecurity.” The report sheds light on what’s going on inside the enterprise that’s enabling significant increases in the number of successful, high-profile breaches. At Centrify, we see Zero Trust Security as the most promising cybersecurity model to emerge in decades, and as the solution to the majority of these breaches. We’ve designed our solutions to help organizations adopt a Zero Trust Security model through a single platform consisting of Identity-as-a-Service (IDaaS), multi-factor authentication (MFA), enterprise mobility management (EMM) and privileged access management…

Break the Trust and Stop the Breach: The Zero Trust Security Model

As 2018 is upon us, it’s time to take stock of our new realities and commit to better behavior that benefits us and our companies. The discussion of the perimeterless enterprise is not new. In fact, the term “de-perimeterisation” was coined by Jon Measham, a former employee of the UK’s Royal Mail in a research paper, and subsequently used by the Jericho Forum back in 2005. The concept is easily understood. Are your employees using their mobile phones to access business data? Do they use SaaS apps like O365, Salesforce, or ServiceNow? If so, then your organization is a perimeterless enterprise. Access to your enterprise…

Five Best Practices for Zero Trust Security

The Centrify Zero Trust Security model is effective because it allows organizations to remove trust from the equation entirely. Based on the assumption that untrusted actors already exist inside and outside the network, Zero Trust leverages powerful identity services to secure every user’s access to apps and infrastructure. Only after identity is authenticated and the integrity of the device is proven can access to resources be granted–but even then with just enough privilege to perform the task at hand. Here are five best practices for achieving Zero Trust security: Always Verify the User with Multi-factor Authentication (MFA) The days of…

Zero Trust Security for the New Australian Data Breach Law

Many Australian businesses need to rethink their approach to security to prepare for their nation’s new mandatory data breach notification law which take effect this month. The Privacy Amendment (Notifiable Data Breaches) Act 2017 enacts the Notifiable Data Breaches (NDB) scheme in Australia from February 22 this year. The NDB scheme mandates that organizations suffering lost or breached data must notify affected customers as soon as they become aware of the breach and must also report the incident to the Privacy Commissioner. The legislation covers information such as personal details, credit reports, credit eligibility details, and tax file number (TFN) records…

Escaping Data-Breach Groundhog Day

Countless companies globally are trapped in data breach Groundhog Day, unable to escape a repeating cycle of cyber attacks. In the 2018 Thales Data Threat Report, produced by 451 Research, the key theme is that while spending in IT Security is increasing, breaches are increasing at a faster pace and becoming more costly. As in past years, the 451 Group report indicates that companies cyber budgets are being spent in areas that have been identified as least effective in securing data. “Clearly, doing what we have been doing for decades is no longer working. The more relevant question on the…

What do Equifax, HBO, Uber and Yahoo All Have in Common?

A consumer ratings agency, a cable network, a transportation company and a web services provider. What ties them together? Sure, they were all impacted by very high-profile security breaches. But, if you dig a little deeper, you’ll find these organizations had a lot in common before, during and after their respective breaches. And those commonalities can teach us valuable lessons. A quick recap Equifax became the latest poster child for cybersecurity after it announced criminals had gained access to the financial data of 143 million people. The massive breach led to 23 class-action lawsuits, a $4.3 billion loss in market…