It’s Time for Managers to Lead Security by Example, Not Blame Younger Workers

The age gap is something that all organisations over the years have had to deal with in one way or another. But the flood of consumer-grade technologies into the workplace in recent years has arguably widened that gap even further. To learn more, Centrify recently polled not only 1,000 UK office workers aged 18-24 but also 500 senior decision makers. We found that the next-generation workforce is unfairly blamed for a range of perceived security issues, when in fact managers are the worst offenders. To enable newer, more flexible and agile ways of working demanded by younger employees, organisations must…

Cyber Risk Insights from the AIG 2017 Cyber Insurance Review

I read with interest AIG’s 2017 Cyber Insurance Review. In a one sentence summary: cyber insurance claims are up, due to systemic ransomware and wiper malware attacks, the cyber business is booming, but we are still early in the market evolution. Reading the report prompted me to ask three questions regarding Cyber Insurance: How well do insurance brokers understand cyber risk and cyber insurance? What percentage of businesses shopping for cyber insurance truly understand their cyber loss exposure in quantitative terms, and conversely how well do brokers understand their exposure What security controls and policies do businesses have in place…

What’s in it for Consumers? The Top 5 Privacy Benefits of the GDPR

The General Data Protection Regulation, or GDPR for short, is a major new European privacy law that went into effect on May 25. GDPR will radically reframe our relationship with the organisations that store and process our data. From Amazon to the UK National Health Service (NHS), organisations around the world are desperately racing to ensure compliance, even after the deadline. Yet despite these efforts, just one in ten consumers have heard of the data protection regulation. That’s a shame, because this is a huge piece of legislation which will impact virtually every industry in its bid to make the…

It’s Almost GDPR D-Day: So What Happens Next?

Over the past 12 months during this blog series I’ve tried to provide insight into some of the key aspects of the GDPR and how organisations can better prepare for the big compliance deadline day of 25 May. Now that day is almost upon us, the question many organisations are asking is, “what happens next?” The truth is that, despite having had years of notice, many are only now waking up to the reality of the new regulatory regime. A recent survey of RSA attendees found just 14% claimed they were fully prepared for the GDPR. So what can we…

SEC Clarification: Companies Must Disclose Breaches

In late February, the U.S. Security and Exchange Commission (SEC) issued new cybersecurity guidance in the form of an “interpretive release.” According to the SEC website, the Commission frequently provides guidance on federal securities laws and SEC regulations for business and investment communities. The release covered three main topics: Disclosure of cybersecurity risks and incidents Companies have been largely remiss in alerting the public to breaches that may directly impact them. Equifax took five months to reveal that the data of 145 million people had been compromised. Yahoo took years to disclose that every one of its user accounts had…

With Less Than 100 Days to Go, How to Get C-Level Buy-in for GDPR Compliance

For GDPR compliance initiatives to work effectively, there has to be buy-in from the boardroom. That doesn’t just mean releasing the necessary funds to bolster efforts ahead of 25 May, but understanding the need for long-term cultural and process changes to the organisation in the years to follow. However, with less than 100 days to go until the compliance deadline, only a quarter (26 per cent) of European firms are fully compliant, according to Forrester. So how can you drive greater awareness at senior levels of your organisation? The good news is that new Centrify research suggests that the C-level…

4 Months to Go: A New Year GDPR Checklist

As we enter the New Year, IT and security leaders have most likely been glued to revelations of major new CPU-level vulnerabilities Meltdown and Spectre, described by researchers as among the “worst ever” discovered. However, there’s arguably an even more pressing concern, not just for IT but the entire organisation: GDPR compliance. There are now just over four months to get your house in order before the sweeping new EU regulation formally comes into force on 25 May. Regulators will be given the power to levy fines of up to 4% of global annual turnover or £17m, whichever is higher….

Six Months and Counting: How Standards and Frameworks Can Help GDPR Compliance

The theft of highly sensitive personal information on 57 million Uber drivers and customers in the Uber data breach — and its subsequent cover-up — is in many ways what the GDPR was invented for. Here is a multi-billion dollar US tech company that reportedly protected access to key data in the cloud by using just static log-ins. Not only did its data protection controls therefore fall short of the best practice “state-of-the-art” approach outlined in the GDPR, but the firm also failed to report the incident — something which would incur a fine of €10m (£8.9m) or 2% of…

NIS Directive Compliance: It’s Just as Important as the GDPR

IT security managers have had plenty on their plate this year co-ordinating compliance efforts in advance of the forthcoming EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). But while the sweeping new privacy law has dominated the headlines for the past year or more, there’s another important piece of regulation on its way from Brussels, that will apply specifically to “operators of essential services” (OES). It’s known as the EU directive on the security of Networks and Information Systems (NIS). With the same huge fines of up to £17m or 4% of global annual turnover levied for non-compliance, it’s vital that you…

Post-Brexit Data Flows: Why There’ll be No Place for UK Firms to Hide from GDPR

As with most aspects of the EU, unhindered cross-border data flows are something most U.K. firms just take for granted these days. Thanks to the cloud, huge volumes of corporate data is stored in third party providers’ data centres, frequently not even in the UK. Aside perhaps from those in highly regulated sectors, corporate users don’t think twice about accessing that data, and sending it to and from partners and customers on the continent. However, the U.K.’s departure from the world’s biggest trading bloc raises new questions about the legality of such transfers. In a new report, the House of…